usagov:

Image description: A Peace Corps volunteer works with a local nurse in a hospital garden in Senegal. The garden provides vegetables to HIV/AIDS patients.
Learn more about volunteer opportunities in the Peace Corps.

usagov:

Image description: A Peace Corps volunteer works with a local nurse in a hospital garden in Senegal. The garden provides vegetables to HIV/AIDS patients.

Learn more about volunteer opportunities in the Peace Corps.

(via peacecorps)


mothernaturenetwork:

Plastic is found in virtually everything these days. Your food and hygiene products are packaged in it. Your car, phone and computer are made from it. And you might even chew on it daily in the form of gum. While most plastics are touted as recyclable, the reality is that they’re “downcycled.” A plastic milk carton can never be recycled into another carton — it can be made into a lower-quality item like plastic lumber, which can’t be recycled.16 simple ways to reduce plastic waste

mothernaturenetwork:

Plastic is found in virtually everything these days. Your food and hygiene products are packaged in it. Your car, phone and computer are made from it. And you might even chew on it daily in the form of gum. While most plastics are touted as recyclable, the reality is that they’re “downcycled.” A plastic milk carton can never be recycled into another carton — it can be made into a lower-quality item like plastic lumber, which can’t be recycled.
16 simple ways to reduce plastic waste


startsomegood:

Water Gives Life and Livelihoods—Volunteers Development for Africa

The adage goes that if you teach a man to fish, he will eat for a lifetime. A project in Kenya is working to prove that if you teach a group of women to farm, they will be able to provide better lives for their families and help uplift the community.

In the drought-stricken village of Makindu, women of all ages have come together to develop a sustainable agriculture project on 20 acres of land. With support from the nonprofit Volunteers Development for Africa, the Makindu Friends Women’s Group proposes to build a water-efficient greenhouse to grow fruits and vegetables as well as a basin for fish farming. The harvest will help the women feed their families, and excess can be sold for additional income to sustain the operation.

The list of project needs is extensive, but the women’s determination to succeed is strong. With local wells providing only limited access to drinking water, the primary task is to dig a borehole to irrigate the farm. Once water supplies are available, the greenhouse can be built, followed by the aquaculture facility. Sturdy fencing is also critical to keep out elephants—who can destroy crops and equipment with just a leisurely stroll.

The cost to dig the well alone is $6,500, and the access to fresh water will pave the way for direct production elements of the project. Learn more about the Makindu Friends Women’s Group Agriculture Project and help empower this group of women, their families and the community through your contribution. 

____________________________________________________________

Michael Beckett

I am principal of Beckett Creative, which provides communications for social enterprise and lifestyle businesses. I have over 25 years of experience working in a range of styles across multiple media. I am bridging the global gap by using online tools to mentor a college student in a South African township, and look forward to meeting him in Johannesburg next year. You can follow me on Twitter @BeckettCreative.

Has this post inspired you to start your own good?  Visit our site to learn about how to start your own campaign.




stainlessplanet:


25 mai : Journée mondiale de l’Afrique (Africa day)


(via akwedomagazine)

stainlessplanet:

25 mai : Journée mondiale de l’Afrique (Africa day)

(via akwedomagazine)


A Zen master, when asked where he would go after he died, replied, ‘To Hell, for that’s where help is needed most.’
Roshi Philip Kapleau (via stainlessplanet)

stainlessplanet:

Half of the world lives on less than US$ 2,5 a day, hard to believe, yet that’s what I witness every day!

stainlessplanet:

Half of the world lives on less than US$ 2,5 a day, hard to believe, yet that’s what I witness every day!


mothernaturenetwork:

Earth has hit its natural resource ceiling for the yearToday marks ‘Earth Overshoot Day’, says the Global Footprint Network. Humans have officially used more natural resources in a year than the Earth can replenish.

mothernaturenetwork:

Earth has hit its natural resource ceiling for the year
Today marks ‘Earth Overshoot Day’, says the Global Footprint Network. Humans have officially used more natural resources in a year than the Earth can replenish.


peacecorps:

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.
- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

peacecorps:

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum